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Coronavirus - Threat or menace?

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  • Coronavirus - Threat or menace?

    How intrusive is this going to get?

    Strictly from a hockey point of view for this forum.

    The Sharks are effectively prohibited from playing home games in their own arena 'til the end of March at least.

    If this outbreak progresses anything like that of the SARS virus, to which this latest one is related, SARS cases peaked in mid-May, so it wouldn't be unexpected for Covid-19 to peak around the same time. That's conference finals time! The potential spoiler factor is off the charts.


  • #2
    wonder if they won't find a temporary home outside santa clara county

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    • #3
      It's pretty serious over here. All but one 6 Nations rugby matches called off (a pretty big deal in UK, France and Italy), all sport in Italy postponed indefinitely, games in France limited to 1k people and some behind closed doors. Champions League football going ahead at the moment but might be suspended or played behind closed doors. Basically they're trying to slow the threat of transmission by cracking down on big gatherings of people in close confinement like you get in sports stadiums.

      You're never going to stop the virus but you can try to stop it becoming a pandemic and overwhelming health care services. Fortunately I live in a country where health care is free

      Good in-depth guide to the science here
      https://arstechnica.com/science/2020...e-coronavirus/

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      • #4
        Take 2mins and watch this...Dr. Drew speaking the truth.

        https://www.facebook.com/natasha.rid...2380551131470/

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        • #5
          Yesterday we had draft proposal and follow-up individual meetings here (Haw. state employment; position is ... hhmmmm, call it essential, but not requiring immediate/in-person performance) for preparing to work from home. I was told that that has never happened here, but the answer was unclear if never happened in the state or just never in our branch of gov't.

          Also, after staying late one evening last week finishing something, I left the courthouse and walked two blocks down across from the waterfront for a place that has good burgers ... and while waiting for my order I got to look at the mammoth Princess cruise ship docked across the street (even took some pictures on my phone) ... ... only to see a few days later that a Princess cruise ship coming from Haw. was suddenly quarantined off the coast of Cal. for multiple positive cases.

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          • #6
            34000 people die from the flu every year, most of those hace underlying conditions or are.elderly. who is this affecting the most, see above. Kids arent affected that differently than a normal flu. So, close your schools, and.clean them. Sure they are always a virus playground, but why the different reaction?

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            • #7
              The reason the coronavirus is getting so much attention (and panic) is the unknown factor. We know what the flu is, have a vaccine and treatment and it has been around for years. Never mind that 250,000 or more die from it worldwide every year, or that close to 50,000,000 are infected each season. Since we know about it, people don't panic. The coronavirus has almost the same symptoms, presents the same level of danger to the same group of people (i.e. elderly and those with weak immune systems are most at risk). But the numbers may be skewed since many people may have had it and not even known, since it can have the same effect as the common cold for those who are generally in good health.

              Personally, I think this thing is overblown. It's on par with the flu in terms of potentially making people significantly ill or causing death (maybe even less of a threat) and the reaction is overkill. This Washington Post article is informative:

              https://www.washingtonpost.com/healt...lu-comparison/

              Getting down to the question of how deadly it is: Which virus is more deadly?

              That’s a difficult question to answer for many reasons. First, health officials are not comparing analogous data sets between the viruses. They have years of influenza data but just months of covid-19 numbers — which are evolving by the day. It’s possible the estimated death rates for the coronavirus might be inflated because a considerable number of people likely have or had the virus but were not diagnosed because their symptoms were too mild to see a doctor.

              “There is also a number of asymptomatic infections we don’t know about,” Nolan said.

              World Health Organization Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a news briefing March 3 that the global case fatality rate for the coronavirus is believed to be about 3.4 percent, higher than the 2.3 percent reported in a China CDC study released in February. But a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine last week found a death rate of 1.4 percent among a group of 1,099 patients, suggesting the rate could be lower than those reported by the WHO and Chinese officials.

              “By comparison, seasonal flu generally kills far fewer than 1 percent of those infected,” Tedros said of the global flu caseload during the news briefing.

              Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has said that the mortality rate for seasonal flu is 0.1 percent.

              “You know, the risk is this: We have a brand-new virus in a completely naive population on Earth; we’re all susceptible to it. Everyone is potentially infectable with this virus,” said Christopher Mores, a global health professor at George Washington University. “Even with a high transmission rate and the low case fatality rate, that still becomes a massive number of ill and fatal cases.”
              Mike Barr, Founder

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              • #8
                Here's the chart over time of SARS cases. SARS was harder to catch, but more deadly. The peak area of the graph is pretty much the playoff season for both the NHL and the NBA.

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002%E..._Worldwide.svg

                Covid-19 seems to be in between it and the conventional flu virus. The part where it seems easier to transmit than SARS is the critical x-factor that is driving the strong government reactions.

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                • #9
                  There will be a global pandemic at some point. National Geographic wrote about this years ago. It is higher odds.on catospraphic threat to the world than Nuclear War, famine, or large space object impact. Although some big object will target Earth some time over the millennia. One can only hope there is a black ops project for that one.

                  Some super bug will also eventually. We will all stay home for 2 to 4 weeks, and move on. At least technology can keep us connected now. No need to go full survivalist yet, but do keep a supply of a few weeks packaged goods on hand in case of emergency. I say everyone should take Vit C and E to boost your immune system, and just rock on. If you are at all at risk, or are sick, stay home. Common sense.

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                  • #10
                    AIK1891, I also work in conjunction with public sector employees. All of the business areas are planning on how to support the public in light of potential threats and shutdowns. I am currently working with a state Labor dept. Their upper management had a multi state call this weekend with states, including Washington on how to hand a potential onslaught of unemployment and disability claims, including care for others claims.

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